Collagen Powder for Joint and Tendon Injuries

Content you'll find:

 

  • What is collagen? 
  • Why should I take collagen powder?
  • Does collagen powder help with joint and tendon injuries?
  • How much collagen powder should I take for joint and tendon injuries?
  • Is collagen effective? What the research tells us.
  • When is the best time to take collagen powder?
  • Why choose Kinetica Collagen Powder Joint* & Muscle** Support Complex

 

 

Getting your nutrition and daily habits on point is vital for optimum healing, repair and recovery, you will not regain strength, function and heal quickly if you do not provide your body with the right amount of energy and nutrients, such as protein[1]. Athletes can be incredibly frustrated when an injury occurs and most often are willing to try or do what it takes to support their recovery. Investing time and energy in nutrition and lifestyle practices offer a way athletes can influence their day-to-day health and recovery in a positive way. Combined with the right nutrition strategy, appropriate supplementation can play a key role to support rehabilitation in most injury cases[2].

For years this strategy was based on whey, omega 3, creatine and increasing anti-inflammatory foods. Then collagen came along. At first, I was skeptical of the impact collagen could have, my understanding of collagen was that it had low amino acid levels, compared to things like dairy proteins and was used as a bulking agent in protein powders and bars. The information continued to emerge and more and more people in the industry started to talk about it as the future of tendon, joint and skeletal health. I remember sitting at a conference in Brussels in 2018 after watching a presentation on the impact of collagen on cartilage repair, thinking there is something in this! I immediately got some samples from one of the most reputable companies in the world of collagen and started to implement it as a supplement strategy to support healing from injury with the athletes that I work with. Before we get into that, let’s take it from the top.
 

What is collagen?

Collagen makes up one-third of all protein in the body and is the most abundant form of structural protein in tendons, cartilage and bones. As collagen is the principal component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), it is vital for the strength and regeneration of this tissue. The ECM is ‘a large network of proteins and other molecules that surround, support and provide structure to cells and tissues in the body’. Collagen is made up of three amino acids—glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline. There are different types of collagen in the body, all with slightly different roles but 80 – 90 % of the collagen in the body consists of types I, II, and III.

Why should I take Collagen Powder?

Collagen supports the mechanical strength and elasticity of tissues and acts as a natural substrate for cellular development.  The research on collagen supplementation is still in its relative infancy, but results in the following areas are showing great promise to support a number of areas in health and sports performance. Collagen has been found to enhance synthesis or growth in different musculoskeletal tissues, including cartilage, ligaments, and bone. For this reason, collagen supplementation has positively linked to healthy aging, healing and repair in the skeletal system Collagen supplementation can benefit:

  • Increasing the level of collagen available in the body for repair.
  • Recovery from injury, tendons, bone and cartilage.
  • Stronger bones and joints for injury resistance

The role of collagen and gelatin protein in joint, tendon and bone healing has garnered significant attention due to increasing prevalence of long-term joint injuries and osteoarthritis from sport participation. The benefits of vitamin C enriched dietary gelatin and hydrolysed collagen proteins to support healing and repair offer a promising strategy to support recovery from tendon and joint injuries

 

collagen powder

Does collagen Powder help with joint and tendon injuries?

As collagen is the principal component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), it is vital for the strength and regeneration of this tissue. Tendons and ligaments are primarily made of collagen protein. Collagen protein is made up of three amino acids—glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline. The collagen protein is hydrolysed enzymatically (broken down), degrading into smaller bioactive peptides that are easily absorbed within the digestive tract (the intestine) before entering circulation and reaching the bone and tendons. Supplementing with collagen which is co-ingested with vitamin C provides the key amino acids that support the strength, ‘stiffness’ and development (hypertrophy) of the injured tendon.  Being really specific, it is suggested that collagen supplementation has the potential to microscopic structure and cross-sectional area of the tendon.

Does collagen help with joint injuries?

Yes! Research has shown that supplementing with collagen in combination with appropriate rehabilitation has been shown to increase collagen synthesis in the body, reduce joint pain, improve joint function and support regenerative processes. If you are aiming to support joint health or recover from a joint injury, it is advisable to consume a collagen supplement to support your overall nutrition strategy

How much collagen Powder should I take for joint and tendon injuries?

Initial research found that a dose of 10-15g, once a day for several months was needed for a positive impact to occur with new cartilage / tissue, but more recent research suggests that when in the right form, 5g is sufficient for the same impact.

For that reason, when formulating the new Collagen Powder product with Kinetica we used 5g of the patented collagen ‘FORTIGEL®’ with 300 mg vitamin C. FORTIGEL® was created by a company called Gelita who are an award-winning company for collagen product development. What is notable from their process is the scientific substantiation of their products. They proactively aim to build a body of scientific evidence behind their products to build integrity and credibility.

 It is important to note that to achieve the benefits from collagen supplementation, it needs to be taken over a prolonged period of time i.e., months rather than weeks! Those taking it need to be patient when taking it as part of their recovery and not expect any instant results! Patience, consistency and focused individual exercise is what brings the best results.

Is collagen effective? What the research tells us.

Research on collagen is still in its relevant infancy but is constantly accumulating. In 2018, the international olympic committee (IOC) consensus statement: ‘dietary supplements and the high-performance athlete’, stated that collagen supplementation was ‘low risk’ and increased collagen production in the body and ‘decreased pain seem possible. More recent research has built a stronger position on the potential benefits of collagen. A systematic review looking at the effects of collagen treatment in clinical studies found that there is ‘strong evidence of 5–15 g/day dose of collagen improving joint pain and functionality’.

From a practitioner point of view, it's the first time in a decade that a supplement has come on the market where there is evidence and genuine potential physical benefits from using it as part of a person's diet.

collagen powder kinetica

You have to stick to your collagen ritual

From my experience with athletes who choose to include collagen supplementation as part of their nutrition strategy, compliance with the long-term protocol is the biggest challenge. Other supplements like creatine or caffeine can show acute or certainly shorter-term benefits which provides affirmation to effort involved. Unfortunately, this is not the case with collagen supplements. Find a way that works for you when it comes to your routine or ritual. Maybe taking it in the morning as part of your hydration routine or in your pre or post workout recovery drink / smoothie could work for you? Some athletes may even take it at night as part of their night-time routine. Being consistent over time is the key message here, it simply will not have the best impact for you if you are not consistent.

When is the best time to take collagen powder?

The intake protocol for Collagen Powder joint and support complex is a little different to something like whey protein because it's about the availability of the key nutrients over the course of time. Put simply, what matters most is that it's taken daily for general skeletal health. For recovery from injury the evidence points more specifically to taking collagen within the hour before your training, workout or rehabilitation session.

 Learn More: Kinetica Collagen Powder Joint and Muscle Support

Summary

Collagen protein supplementation provides a significant and positive strategy for people managing joint, tendon and bone health issues. It isn't a magic pill and your injury or pain will not simply clear up when you start taking it. You must have a solid holistic strategy that includes a nutrition plan, an individualised rehabilitation program and a consistent protocol. Finally, while there are some key considerations around its consumption, I believe collagen supplementation is one of the most significant developments in the industry in the past 10 years. I am beyond excited to have launched Collagen Muscle and Joint Complex and believe it's going to be a huge asset for athletes, non-athletes and anyone who wants to invest in their skeletal health.

Why choose Kinetica Collagen Joint & Muscle Support Complex

The Kinetica Collagen Joint and Muscle Support Complex brings together the best possible evidence based ingredients to support joint, tendon and skeletal health. The patented collagen FORTIGEL® from Gelita, is one of the most highly regarded collagen brands in the industry and has been used as the key ingredient. It produces the highest level of impact on the tendon and joints in the body. Research on FORTIGEL® has shown that it is ‘absorbed intestinally and accumulates in cartilage’. Most significantly, it has been shown to stimulate cartilage metabolism.  Let’s take a closer look.

 

A breakdown of the ingredients and their benefits

Ingredient

Amount

Benefit

Collagen FORTIGEL®

5g

Bone, joint, cartilage and skeletal health. FORTIGEL® is a product of a proprietary hydrolysis process. It is a combination of bioactive collagen peptides, shown to stimulate the metabolism of joint cells, which aid the maintenance and development of cartilage. Due to the hydrolysis process, 5 g has been seen to be sufficient to have a measurable impact compared to more generic collagen formulations.

Vitamin C

300 mg

Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of blood vessels. The inclusion of vitamin C as part of a collagen supplement strategy has been seen to be vital for supporting collagen formation.  

Hyaluronic acid 100mg 

100 mg

Hyaluronic acid is a natural substance found in the body, particularly in joints for lubrication. There is potential for hyaluronic acid to help reduce stiffness and pain in joints. An 8-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial found that Oral consumption of hyaluronic acid appeared to be effective for knee osteoarthritis  patients in the relief of knee OA symptoms, ‘particularly in pain and physical function’ [9] 

Vitamin D

5 ug

Vitamin D is vital for calcium absorption, bone health and many research studies link low vitamin D levels to increased risk of fractures in older adults[10].

Glucosamine Sulphate

500mg

Glucosamine is a natural compound found in healthy cartilage. The balance of research suggests that it can help to support joint health and may reduce joint pain.

 

daniel davey collage powder

About the Author

Daniel Davey is a Kinetica Ambassador, Performance Nutritionist, best-selling author and founder of Davey Nutrition. Daniel has a BSc. In Science, MSc in Nutrition and IOC DIP in Sports Nutrition. He has over a decade of experience working with elite athletes and the general consumer, combining scientific evidence and innovative practice for peak performance and health.

 

Reference list:

Tipton, K.D., 2015. Nutritional support for exercise-induced injuries. Sports Medicine45(1), pp.93-104.

Shaw, G., Lee-Barthel, A., Ross, M.L., Wang, B. and Baar, K., 2017. Vitamin C–enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis. The American journal of clinical nutrition105(1), pp.136-143.

Quintero, K.J., de Sá Resende, A., Leite, G.S.F. and Junior, A.H.L., 2018. An overview of nutritional strategies for recovery process in sports-related muscle injuries. Nutrire43(1), p.27.

Shaw, G., Lee-Barthel, A., Ross, M.L., Wang, B. and Baar, K., 2017. Vitamin C–enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis. The American journal of clinical nutrition105(1), pp.136-143.

Khatri, M., Naughton, R.J., Clifford, T., Harper, L.D. and Corr, L., 2021. The effects of collagen peptide supplementation on body composition, collagen synthesis, and recovery from joint injury and exercise: a systematic review. Amino Acids, pp.1-14.

McAlindon, T.E., Nuite, M., Krishnan, N., Ruthazer, R., Price, L.L., Burstein, D., Griffith, J. and Flechsenhar, K., 2011. Change in knee osteoarthritis cartilage detected by delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging following treatment with collagen hydrolysate: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage19(4), pp.399-405.

Papadopoulou, S.K., 2020. Rehabilitation nutrition for injury recovery of athletes: the role of macronutrient intake. Nutrients12(8), p.2449.

Balshaw, T.G., Funnell, M.P., McDermott, E., Maden‐Wilkinson, T.M., Abela, S., Quteishat, B., Edsey, M., James, L.J. and Folland, J.P., 2023. The effect of specific bioactive collagen peptides on function and muscle remodeling during human resistance training. Acta Physiologica237(2), p.e13903.

Maughan, R.J., Burke, L.M., Dvorak, J., Larson-Meyer, D.E., Peeling, P., Phillips, S.M., Rawson, E.S., Walsh, N.P., Garthe, I., Geyer, H. and Meeusen, R., 2018. IOC consensus statement: dietary supplements and the high-performance athlete. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism28(2), pp.104-125.

Wang, S.J., Wang, Y.H. and Huang, L.C., 2021. The effect of oral low molecular weight liquid hyaluronic acid combination with glucosamine and chondroitin on knee osteoarthritis patients with mild knee pain: An 8-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Medicine100(5).

Wang, N., Chen, Y., Ji, J., Chang, J., Yu, S. and Yu, B., 2020. The relationship between serum vitamin D and fracture risk in the elderly: a meta-analysis. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research15, pp.1-10.

Tipton, K.D., 2015. Nutritional support for exercise-induced injuries. Sports Medicine45(1), pp.93-104.

Papadopoulou, S.K., 2020. Rehabilitation nutrition for injury recovery of athletes: the role of macronutrient intake. Nutrients12(8), p.2449.

Khatri, M., Naughton, R.J., Clifford, T., Harper, L.D. and Corr, L., 2021. The effects of collagen peptide supplementation on body composition, collagen synthesis, and recovery from joint injury and exercise: a systematic review. Amino Acids, pp.1-14.

Shaw, G., Lee-Barthel, A., Ross, M.L., Wang, B. and Baar, K., 2017. Vitamin C–enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis. The American journal of clinical nutrition105(1), pp.136-143. 

Khatri, M., Naughton, R.J., Clifford, T., Harper, L.D. and Corr, L., 2021. The effects of collagen peptide supplementation on body composition, collagen synthesis, and recovery from joint injury and exercise: a systematic review. Amino Acids53(10), pp.1493-1506.

McAlindon, T.E., Nuite, M., Krishnan, N., Ruthazer, R., Price, L.L., Burstein, D., Griffith, J. and Flechsenhar, K., 2011. Change in knee osteoarthritis cartilage detected by delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging following treatment with collagen hydrolysate: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage19(4), pp.399-405.

Maughan, R.J., Burke, L.M., Dvorak, J., Larson-Meyer, D.E., Peeling, P., Phillips, S.M., Rawson, E.S., Walsh, N.P., Garthe, I., Geyer, H. and Meeusen, R., 2018. IOC consensus statement: dietary supplements and the high-performance athlete. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism28(2), pp.104-125.

Khatri, M., Naughton, R.J., Clifford, T., Harper, L.D. and Corr, L., 2021. The effects of collagen peptide supplementation on body composition, collagen synthesis, and recovery from joint injury and exercise: a systematic review. Amino Acids53(10), pp.1493-1506.

Wang, S.J., Wang, Y.H. and Huang, L.C., 2021. The effect of oral low molecular weight liquid hyaluronic acid combination with glucosamine and chondroitin on knee osteoarthritis patients with mild knee pain: An 8-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Medicine100(5).

Wang, N., Chen, Y., Ji, J., Chang, J., Yu, S. and Yu, B., 2020. The relationship between serum vitamin D and fracture risk in the elderly: a meta-analysis. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research15, pp.1-10.

 

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