To begin, it’s important to note that creatine’s uses extend beyond the scope of professional athletes. Oftentimes, when advised on best practice for consumption, it’s use is promoted for athletes who partake in ‘high intensity’ exercise. This is often imagined as competitive weight training or elite sprinting, but it’s so much more than that. In fact, “fast-twitch” muscle fibres, which can be reinforced through creatine consumption, are used regularly by the recreational cyclist challenging their partner to a sprint up the hill that used to leave them gasping, the twice weekly tennis player wanting to improve their serve in the latter part of a game, and the basketballer spinning on their heel to make another fast break on a Friday evening after work.

 

Whey is the naturally occurring liquid component of milk. For thousands of years, cheesemakers separated milk into liquid and curds but discarded the watery substance. It is thought that during the time of Hippocrates in Ancient Greece that the value of whey in human health was first realised, along with its apparent links to a stronger immune system. In the years that followed, the protein derived from whey has been extensively researched and shown to promote muscle mass gains (especially during resistance training), spare the loss of muscle mass during times of calorific restriction, and reduce the rate of natural loss of muscle mass associated with ageing.(1) This has led to huge emphasis on whey protein as an exercise supplement for all participation levels. Not all sports nutrition descriptions emphasise, however, that whey protein’s uses are far from limited to those who wish to increase muscle size.

 

Whey is the naturally occurring liquid component of milk. For thousands of years, cheesemakers separated milk into liquid and curds but discarded the watery substance. It is thought that during the time of Hippocrates in Ancient Greece that the value of whey in human health was first realised, along with its apparent links to a stronger immune system. In the years that followed, the protein derived from whey has been extensively researched and shown to promote muscle mass gains (especially during resistance training), spare the loss of muscle mass during times of calorific restriction, and reduce the rate of natural loss of muscle mass associated with ageing.(1) This has led to huge emphasis on whey protein as an exercise supplement for all participation levels. Not all sports nutrition descriptions emphasise, however, that whey protein’s uses are far from limited to those who wish to increase muscle size.

 

 

When & How Best to Consume Whey Protein

Whey protein products can be consumed in a variety of ways to best fit your exercise, work, and life schedule. Simply add a scoop to your low GI porridge, your smoothie at break time, or show off your Kinetica shaker with a simple whey and water/milk combination. You can even treat those at home by adding flavoured powders to your favourite recipes like pancakes, cookies, and brownies. While whey protein has been shown to be particularly effective at promoting muscle development when consumed in the periods directly before, during, or after your workout(1), recent studies have shown that the most important factor is actually total daily protein intake(2). This means you can have it whenever suits you best because we all know that no day is the same as yesterday.

 

Feel Fuller for Longer

 

An attractive aspect of whey protein is its effect on satiety. Thanks to protein being the most satiating macronutrient when compared to carbohydrates and fats(3), it can increase fat loss and boost metabolic rate while preserving lean muscle mass. Incorporating a higher amount of protein into your diet can help curtail cravings and reduce late-night snacking so you can avoid scanning up and down the fridge for treats before going to bed. In short, it makes you feel fuller for longer. Whey protein should be used as a supplement, however, and not a replacement for other foods, so it is important to maintain a balanced diet whilst using the product for maximum results.

An attractive aspect of whey protein is its effect on satiety. Thanks to protein being the most satiating macronutrient when compared to carbohydrates and fats(3), it can increase fat loss and boost metabolic rate while preserving lean muscle mass. Incorporating a higher amount of protein into your diet can help curtail cravings and reduce late-night snacking so you can avoid scanning up and down the fridge for treats before going to bed. In short, it makes you feel fuller for longer. Whey protein should be used as a supplement, however, and not a replacement for other foods, so it is important to maintain a balanced diet whilst using the product for maximum results.

Added Health & Wellness Benefits of Whey Protein

Added Health & Wellness
Benefits of Whey Protein

 

A number of other health and wellness benefits have been demonstrated in the literature. Whey protein consumption has been shown to have positive impacts on reducing high blood pressure, improving vascular health, and controlling blood sugars.(4, 5) It has also been shown to reduce the symptoms of stress and depression by improving mood through increasing serotonin activity and reducing cortisol concentration in the brain.(6) So next time you see your work colleague about to pour the liquid sitting on top of their yoghurt down the sink after opening the lid, explain to them what it actually is, the benefits of whey protein, and why they should stir it back in.

Whey Protein & Sleep Hygiene

 

A top tip for those of us who find ourselves lying awake at night is to have your 1-2 scoops of Kinetica Whey Protein or Lean Active Protein before bed thanks to the presence of Tryptophan. This is an important amino acid which breaks down in the body to serotonin which in turn becomes melatonin, a key ingredient in the process of falling asleep. We recommend taking your daily serving of these products before bed to both aid with sleep and also to prevent muscle breakdown overnight. Good sleep hygiene has been shown to have countless positive impacts in areas such as sporting performance, productivity at work, and mental health.

 

The key take home message is that whey protein is a convenient, efficient, and healthy way to add protein to your diet. Whether you’re competing internationally or exercising for fun with friends, it can improve your ability to get the maximum benefit and enjoyment from your workout on a regular basis.

A number of other health and wellness benefits have been demonstrated in the literature. Whey protein consumption has been shown to have positive impacts on reducing high blood pressure, improving vascular health, and controlling blood sugars.(4, 5) It has also been shown to reduce the symptoms of stress and depression by improving mood through increasing serotonin activity and reducing cortisol concentration in the brain.(6) So next time you see your work colleague about to pour the liquid sitting on top of their yoghurt down the sink after opening the lid, explain to them what it actually is, the benefits of whey protein, and why they should stir it back in.

Whey Protein and Sleep Hygiene

How can Kinetica Help?

At Kinetica we understand that one size doesn’t fit all, so we have developed two whey protein products for our consumers which are low in sugar, gluten free, and suitable for vegetarians.

  • Kinetica Whey Protein
  • Kinetica Lean Active Protein

Whey Protein and Sleep Hygiene

 

A top tip for those of us who find ourselves lying awake at night is to have your 1-2 scoops of Kinetica Whey Protein or Lean Active Protein before bed thanks to the presence of Tryptophan. This is an important amino acid which breaks down in the body to serotonin which in turn becomes melatonin, a key ingredient in the process of falling asleep. We recommend taking your daily serving of these products before bed to both aid with sleep and also to prevent muscle breakdown overnight. Good sleep hygiene has been shown to have countless positive impacts in areas such as sporting performance, productivity at work, and mental health.

 

The key take home message is that whey protein is a convenient, efficient, and healthy way to add protein to your diet. Whether you’re competing internationally or exercising for fun with friends, it can improve your ability to get the maximum benefit and enjoyment from your workout on a regular basis.

 

How Kinetica Can Help

 

At Kinetica we understand that one size doesn’t fit all, so we have developed two whey protein products for our consumers which are low in sugar, gluten free, and suitable for vegetarians.

  • Kinetica Whey Protein
  • Kinetica Lean Active Protein

What’s the difference between Kinetica Whey Protein & Lean Active?

 

Kinetica Whey Protein is used by a wide range of athletes and weekend warriors who have their sights set on personal goals and for the everyday consumer that wants to optimise their overall health and wellbeing. Whether you’re training to maximise the distance per stroke in the pool, to increase the weight on the squat bar at the gym, or to move to the next level of difficulty at Pilates, whey protein promotes lean muscle strength and recovery to help you achieve your targets and reduce muscle wastage as you get older.

 

 

Kinetica Lean Active Protein is a specialised supplement designed to aid your overall weight management goals, boost protein levels, and help maintain lean muscle in conjunction with a healthy diet and training. Think of it like our famous Whey Protein but with a lower protein dosage as well as being lower in carbohydrate and calories. It’s also high in fibre to keep you fuller for longer and has green tea extract, for added wellness. While our Lean Active Protein is particularly popular amongst competitive athletes in weight-based sports like boxing or rowing, a large proportion of consumers use this supplement for their own individual weight objectives outside of competition.

 

At Kinetica, each and every whey protein product is batch tested within the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) framework to ensure we offer our consumers a safe and dependable sports nutrition product. Product safety is always our number one priority.

 

Kinetica. You know why. We know how.

 

 

Kinetica Whey Protein is used by a wide range of athletes and weekend warriors who have their sights set on personal goals and for the everyday consumer that wants to optimise their overall health and wellbeing. Whether you’re training to maximise the distance per stroke in the pool, to increase the weight on the squat bar at the gym, or to move to the next level of difficulty at Pilates, whey protein promotes lean muscle strength and recovery to help you achieve your targets and reduce muscle wastage as you get older.

 

 

Kinetica Lean Active Protein is a specialised supplement designed to aid your overall weight management goals, boost protein levels, and help maintain lean muscle in conjunction with a healthy diet and training. Think of it like our famous Whey Protein but with a lower protein dosage as well as being lower in carbohydrate and calories. It’s also high in fibre to keep you fuller for longer and has green tea extract, for added wellness. While our Lean Active Protein is particularly popular amongst competitive athletes in weight-based sports like boxing or rowing, a large proportion of consumers use this supplement for their own individual weight objectives outside of competition.

 

At Kinetica, each and every whey protein product is batch tested within the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) framework to ensure we offer our consumers a safe and dependable sports nutrition product. Product safety is always our number one priority.

 

Kinetica. You know why. We know how.

 


 

  1. Devries MC, Phillips SM. Supplemental protein in support of muscle mass and health: advantage whey. J Food Sci. 2015;80 Suppl 1:A8-a15.
  2. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Kohnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006;136(1 Suppl):269s-73s.
  3. Boirie Y, Dangin M, Gachon P, Vasson MP, Maubois JL, Beaufrere B. Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997;94(26):14930-5.
  4. Willoughby DS, Stout JR, Wilborn CD. Effects of resistance training and protein plus amino acid supplementation on muscle anabolism, mass, and strength. Amino Acids. 2007;32(4):467-77.
  5. Schoenfeld BJ, Aragon AA, Krieger JW. The effect of protein timing on muscle strength and hypertrophy: a meta-analysis. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2013;10(1):53.
  6. Paddon-Jones D, Westman E, Mattes RD, Wolfe RR, Astrup A, Westerterp-Plantenga M. Protein, weight management, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;87(5):1558s-61s.
  7. Pal S, Ellis V. The chronic effects of whey proteins on blood pressure, vascular function, and inflammatory markers in overweight individuals. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010;18(7):1354-9.
  8. Jakubowicz D, Froy O. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms by which dietary whey protein may combat obesity and Type 2 diabetes. J Nutr Biochem. 2013;24(1):1-5.
  9. Markus CR, Olivier B, Panhuysen GE, Van Der Gugten J, Alles MS, Tuiten A, et al. The bovine protein alpha-lactalbumin increases the plasma ratio of tryptophan to the other large neutral amino acids, and in vulnerable subjects raises brain serotonin activity, reduces cortisol concentration, and improves mood under stress. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(6):1536-44.
  1. Devries MC, Phillips SM. Supplemental protein in support of muscle mass and health: advantage whey. J Food Sci. 2015;80 Suppl 1:A8-a15.
  2. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Kohnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006;136(1 Suppl):269s-73s.
  3. Boirie Y, Dangin M, Gachon P, Vasson MP, Maubois JL, Beaufrere B. Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997;94(26):14930-5.
  4. Willoughby DS, Stout JR, Wilborn CD. Effects of resistance training and protein plus amino acid supplementation on muscle anabolism, mass, and strength. Amino Acids. 2007;32(4):467-77.
  5. Schoenfeld BJ, Aragon AA, Krieger JW. The effect of protein timing on muscle strength and hypertrophy: a meta-analysis. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2013;10(1):53.
  6. Paddon-Jones D, Westman E, Mattes RD, Wolfe RR, Astrup A, Westerterp-Plantenga M. Protein, weight management, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;87(5):1558s-61s.
  7. Pal S, Ellis V. The chronic effects of whey proteins on blood pressure, vascular function, and inflammatory markers in overweight individuals. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010;18(7):1354-9.
  8. Jakubowicz D, Froy O. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms by which dietary whey protein may combat obesity and Type 2 diabetes. J Nutr Biochem. 2013;24(1):1-5.
  9. Markus CR, Olivier B, Panhuysen GE, Van Der Gugten J, Alles MS, Tuiten A, et al. The bovine protein alpha-lactalbumin increases the plasma ratio of tryptophan to the other large neutral amino acids, and in vulnerable subjects raises brain serotonin activity, reduces cortisol concentration, and improves mood under stress. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(6):1536-44.